Mar 03

: Hello and Welcome from the BCBA!

Thank you for visiting us at BaldwinBees.com, online home of the Baldwin County Beekeeper Association.

We’d like to also invite you to join us at one of our regular monthly meetings that are typically held on the first Monday of each month at the PZK hall, 17933 State Hwy 104 in Robertsdale, Alabama.

Explore our little place on the WWW for information sharing about the rewarding, interesting, and important hobby of beekeeping.

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Apr 26

Beekeepers Helping Beekeepers

Anyone, experienced or novice, that would like assistance working their bees can contact any of the following Baldwin Beekeeper Association members.  These members have volunteered and are ready and willing to help you with your hives.

Daryl Pichoff
Amy and John Gohres
Philip Webb
Gene Hinton
Roy Hyde
Chip Bryars
Bryan Jarvis
Leslie Lomers

 

Mar 06

Swarms and unwanted bee colonies

Swarms

Honey Bee swarms are a natural biological event.  Although swarms normally occur during the spring months of April and May in Alabama, they could happen in other months as well.  Beekeepers do their best to prevent their own colonies from swarming throughout the year but often nature will not be cooperative.

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Conditions that include abundant nectar and pollen become “trigger” points for colonies to swarm as a natural means of ensuring continuation and growth of the species.  Swarms issue after the queen has laid an egg; the colony has fed that egg in such a way that a queen cell develops (a swarm cell); a short time before the new queen cell hatches about one-third to two-thirds of the colony swarms out of the hive and normally congregates on a tree or other object approximately 30-40 yards from the originating colony.  The massive “bunch of bees” at this point ensures that the original queen has made the flight and is within the swarm population.  Scouts now begin identifying new locations for the swarm to reside and build a new hive.

After negotiations within the swarm and scouts, a location is selected and all the bees relocate to the new location.  The swarm will generally only stay in on its initial swarm point for one to three days while the scouts are identifying potential new locations.

Honey_Bee_Swarm_Removal_Kids_Yard_ToysSwarms are generally not aggressive.  They do not have brood (eggs/larva) or food resources to defend.  Public concern over locations of swarm points (personal residences, schools, day care centers, senior centers, etc) are understandable. Our members listed below provide swarm removal services.

What can I do about honey bees in my walls, attic or other structures on my property?

If you have honey bees that have moved in to a structure a beekeeper may be willing to perform a “cut out”, or help you open up the wall and remove the bees and their honey, wax, and brood (immature bees). Cut outs can be difficult and expensive, but is preferable to simply killing the bees. Killing bees but leaving honey and dead brood within a structure can cause rot and mold, and lead to infestations by ants, mice or other critters looking to consume the honey. Contact one of the providers below for specific information.

Are my bees Honey Bees?

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Contact any of the following beekeepers, if you have unwanted bees on your property. They are willing to remove swarms.

Rebekah Hargraves 251-964-0559 All of Baldwin County (will cut out of walls)
Brian Dunn 251-550-5117 (Will cut out of walls)
Daryl Pichoff 251-233-9485 All of Baldwin County South of I-10
Jim Owens 251-987-5715 South of US 98 Foley East
Thomas Fussell 251-752-0284 Bon Secour, South of 98, Marlo
Bill Stephens 251-978-0656 South of I-10
Trent Scott 251-209-3503 Fairhope area
Christel Cherrix 251-269-5642 / 929-2500 Elberta area
 Doug West 251-716-1488  Magnolia Springs, Daphne, Fairhope
 Roger Bemis 251-213-0168  Baldwin County